February 21, 2012

Autism Treatment Network (ATN)- CHOP, Philadelphia

Posted in Life's Little Moments, My Take on Autism tagged , , , , , , , , , at 10:39 am by autismmommytherapist

I check my watch for the fifth time, and my timepiece tells me in no uncertain terms that one of my children is indeed entering his second hour of testing without either of his parents present. I have to smile, because this would never have transpired if it was Justin’s appointment. Through this gift of time it appears I may even have mastered the equally daunting tasks of learning how to text AND delete emails on my new smart phone, so the minutes without child have been well-spent.

My husband is just about to go in search of snacks when we hear the double-doors on the far side of the waiting area crash open, and a bundle of energy over three feet high runs the expanse of the room and crashes onto my lap. “Mommy, I’m here!” he announces to the sparsely-filled room, and the three adults surrounding him grin, certain that everyone currently inhabiting CHOP (Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia) is aware that he is indeed in residence.

“He did really well” our kindly psychologist, Dr. Iadarola, informs us, and Jeff and I begin to gather the twelve bags that consist of either boy’s entourage when we take them on doctor’s visits. Zach is soon badgering us for snacks and juice, and we promise him he’ll have access to both when we return to the examination room. We’re about a third of the way through our initial visit at CHOP’s Autism Treatment Network (ATN), a program we found out about from the Autism Speaks website.

We’ve taken him here today in part because he’ll be entering kindergarten in the fall, and we thought he should have a comprehensive examination prior to that hallmark event. We’ve also chosen this program in part because the allure of having him evaluated by a cadre of professionals whose expertise is actually in the diagnosis and treatment of autism spectrum disorders is too great to resist.

As I’ve mentioned before, it doesn’t take much these days to make me happy.

Now that Zach has concluded the “exam portion” of the visit, which included an administration of two tools created to assess his level of involvement on the spectrum and his IQ, it’s time for his parents to be interviewed. He’ll spend over an hour out of the room with the lovely ATN receptionist, who will learn more about dinosaurs than she ever wanted to know in one lifetime.

The document which will be employed by the psychologist is called the Vineland, a diagnostic tool with which I am so familiar I offer jokingly both to ask and answer the questions if it will save us all time. Jeff and I dutifully (and humorously) respond to queries about his development, self-help skills (fabulous except when it comes to chores), and desire for social engagement (no issues there). At the end, the psychologist says this was one of the best “Vineland interviews” she’s ever had.

Gold stars are distributed to both me and Jeff.

At the conclusion of the interview a slightly weary receptionist returns our completely wound-up child to us. After a small interlude, in which our psychologist and nurse practitioner for the day will inform our developmental pediatrician of their findings, the final portion of the appointment commences. During the last hour of our visit Zach will be poked and prodded a bit by the nurse practitioner, an event which he will not take to with great zeal. A magic marker will be thrown to the floor in protest, and after half a dozen firm requests and a bit of “protest-flopping” on the cold tile of the exam room, the offending writing tool will finally be returned to its rightful adult owner.

A dozen different dinosaur pictures will be drawn, the last of which Zach will utilize that errant marker to poke our developmental pediatrician in the face, just to make sure she takes in the entirety of its glory. For this last portion of our day he was, in the words of my late grandma, “quite a pill”, and his parents couldn’t be happier, because that behavior is exactly why we’re here in the first place. We’re pretty certain Zach is exhibiting some symptoms of ADHD on top of his mild autism, and we’re here to see if the professionals view him that way too.

Dr. Amanda Bennett, our developmental pediatrician that afternoon, asks us if this is the type of behavior we sometimes see at home, and we respond in the affirmative. She knows that variations on this theme are sometimes acted out in school because his teacher has filled out a Vanderbilt ADHD Diganostic Teacher Rating Scale  on his behavior, a form which was really helpful to her in preparing for our visit.

We inform her of behavioral strategies employed both at home and in the classroom, techniques I used with my own students that I could recite in my sleep. I tell her that at our fairly recent parent-teacher conference I had shared with his beloved educator that in many respects, any atypical behavior Zach was exhibiting was more reminiscent of a child with ADHD. I had said to her that although the signs of autism still existed, I felt they were far less prominent that his impulsivity. I admit I’d wondered if she would think I was delusional, but thankfully, our opinions on my boy seemed to coincide.

It’s lovely when that happens.

Once Zach is again buoyed down with pretzels and liquids, Dr. Bennett and Dr. Iadarola go on to share their findings with us, as Jeff and I listen raptly. As expected they still find him to be on the spectrum, but admit they were on the fence about it. They shared with us that being privy to his past history of regression, added to his being the sibling of a child with autism, were the two facts that pushed them over that proverbial fence. Our team of professionals goes on to state that they concur with our thoughts that he does indeed have a co-morbid disorder of ADHD (approximately 60% of children with autism have another disorder as well).

They also inform us they feel his parents and his school already have appropriate behavioral strategies in place (yay for us!). Dr. Bennett closes with mentioning studies that suggest that the most effective over-all strategy to address ADHD is to combine behavioral techniques with medication, and mentions there are a myriad of said medications available if we choose to go that route.

While it’s not exactly our dream to medicate our child, it’s so refreshing to know there’s choices available if we one day need them.

Dr. Bennett promises us a list of recommendations once their computer program allows her entry again, and the next day we’ll find her good to her word. Our visit is concluded, and I realize we’ve been within the confines of CHOP for almost five consecutive hours. None of us (particularly me) has cried, and every member of the team has appeared exceedingly knowledgeable, and treated us with courtesy, and respect.

After a few horrific encounters with “professionals” over the years, I insist on the latter.

All in all, Jeff and I were very pleased with our experience at the ATN at CHOP, and will definitely have Zachary continue with the program. Of course most of the reason our expectations were met was due to the particular professionals who were on duty that day, so I can’t promise every encounter would go as smoothly, or be as helpful as this afternoon was to us. If any parents out there are looking for kind and compassionate professionals to conduct a thorough evaluation of a child they suspect may be on the autism spectrum, or are just looking for a change of practitioners, I couldn’t recommend this route more highly.

And to all our wonderful practitioners, a grateful parent once again says thanks.

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2 Comments »

  1. Misifusa said,

    So glad your experience was good…great news on Z as well!
    xo

  2. Shivon said,

    YAY YAY YAY!! This is awesome ❤


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